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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
for businesses to discriminate against lbgt people. it was pushed by people who fear that the freedom of religion is under attack. but she pushed back saying there were no instances in arizona of religious freedom taking a backseat to lbgt right. >> senate bill 1062 does not address a specific concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i have not heard of one example in arizona where business owners' religious liberty has been violated. >> the thing is, arizona is not an outlier here anymore. at least 12 other states are looking at similar bills. oregon could even see something on its ballot this year. several of these efforts have run into roadblocks, sure, or even political abandonment following the outcry in arizona. but it is, we think, all part of a larger strategy on the right, invoking religion as a trump card in venues where there was actually a consensus that other, shall we say, nonreligious values rule. i'm thinking about like profits in the corporate board room or science in the public hospital. and where arizona's effort failed spectacularly, a more careful interpretation and v
of the law substantially burdenening somebody's exercise of religion. arizona is one of many that has laws like that. so what was different about this arizona law is that it would have expanded the law to apply not just to individuals but to businesss that get sued by someone in a private lawsuit, someone that they refuse to serve and what got the sponsors of the bill concerned was a decision last year in neighboring new mexico when the supreme court there ruled against a be queer key photographers who refused to photograph the ceremony of two women. and this is exactly at the heart of the challenge to the obamacare law that the supreme court will hear next month. >> gwen rattled off this week's different developments. you've got fights in state houses and in courthouses. what else is going on? >> a texas judge became the latest to strike down a ban on same sex marriage saying that it's -- there's no good reason to do that. gwen: how many states have done that? >> in terms of court action, six or seven. we have 17 states in which same sex marriage is allowed. we have a trial that starred t
under state law in arizona. race, gender and religion are but being gay is not. it wasn't protected before brewer vetoed the bill and it still isn't protected after the veto. the waiting photographer refused to fake pick kpurs of the gay couple and she was sued for it. the bill she vetoed was an effort to protect against the legal challenges that could result from discrimination. even with this bill gone there is no law on arizona's books that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation. at least 12 states this year has issued legislation like arizona to extend the tide. senator mike lee of utah, conservative republican has introduced the marriage and religious freedom act. as they scramble topaz these laws, though, the courts seem to be moving in the opposite direction, even when it comes to red state america. just this week a federal judge ordered officials in the state of kentucky to start recognizing the marriage of same-sex couples that were performed outside of the state. and in texas, federal judge struck down that state's ban on same-sex marriage ruling that the cur
borders that has politics married to religion. >> that's something the uae can't count enance as being a sort of rival to the pour in abu dhabi. the likewise who have a wahabi outlook don't view the misslum brotherhood and its marriage of politics and islam as a legitimate force within their current tree. there are pro-muslim brotherhood supporters in these countries. they represent a genuine political force. >> worries these gulf states. qatar has had kawadari living there for 50 years. they have formed close links with the muslim brotherhood leadership, not just in egypt but across the region. they viewed it for a chance of expanding their interests. the others have viewed it as a threat to their interests. >> thank you very much for that, michael stephens >> reporter: thank you. >> in london there. >>> coming up here on the program, we will be taking a look at the big issues and the big players at the world's largest democracy prepares for national elections. >>> the little boy with big dreams. how a free school in bangladesh is giving him and other children hope. >> start with one
a hotly debated religion bill, business leaders across the state are calling on governor jan brewer to veto the proposed law or risk damaging the state's image and its economic recovery. >> opponents now include the arizona chamber of commerce, the arizona super bowl host committee, apple which has major interests in this state, and both americans airlines and mare rot. now, as local and national businesses are making their voices heard, politicians both in and outside of arizona are pushing to distance themselves from the law. three senators from arizona who voted for the bill are now, actually, get this, are urging the governor to veto it. and state senator steve pierce told chris hayes last night, it was some sort of crazy mixup. >> i believe it was going to be slowed down, wasn't going to come to the floor as soon as it did. i can tell you there's a number of us that we were terxting eac other madly, do we go with it, do we not? so we made a mistake. that's about all i can tell you is we went the wrong way. >> yes. they went the wrong way. and it's too late to reverse that becau
religion, also under consideration at this point. joining me here onset to make sense of all of this is one of the big voices from the last few years of lgbt advocacy, roberta caplin argued edie windsor's case before the supreme court. i can only imagine how stressful it was. you had an entire movement riding on your shoulders. thank you for joining us and trying to make sense of the latest events. we see yesterday's news out of texas, similar rulings before that in virginia and kentucky. what do you think the future holds for those cases? what do you think the next thing to hit the supreme court might be? >> the windsor case came down at the end of june. since that decision there have been 15 court decisions in courts throughout the country in places like as you mentioned, kentucky, virginia, utah, oklahoma, all relying on windsor. i don't think that's surprising at all. windsor is about the core dignity of gay people and how they have the same type of dignity and should get the same respect as everyone else. once the supreme court has said that as i predicted back in the summer, it's all
. we all know religion was cited repeatedly in a different context for racial segregation, then people moved on and a lot of religious believers today do not look at their teachings any more as a justification for that. >> well, that's because that was perversion of scripture. look, scripture doesn't change. the guide is the same yesterday, today, forever, the evangelical will tell you and because they believe that way, to use scripture in a way to prof ul gait segregation is wrong and a misuse of scripture. that's a separate altogether, ari. >> i don't want to go too deeply theological, and you might just win that debate, if it comes to certain parts of the book i don't know as well, but what i also want to get in is the politics on 2016. margie, are there going to be republicans that decide when they are running, they need to be the first mainstream republican presidential candidate to be open to marriage equality? margie first. >> i think there are some republicans who might be a candidate for doing that. i don't know if that's a winning strategy in some of these early primary state
businesses to turn away gay customers. in the name of religion. >> arizona governor jan brewer is under intense pressure to veto, tweeting overnight that she will do the right thing for the state. more now from abc's cecilia vega. >> outrage at the state capitol. as governor jan brewer faces a decision, does she sign into law a bill in the name of religious freedom to refuse to serve gay people or veto it. but companies are pouncing, saying the law would create an unfriendly climate that's bad for business. joining the chorus, marriott hotels. tech giant, apple. which has plans to open a 2,000 job high-tech plant in the state. and american airlines. whose ceo wrote, this bill send the wrong message. mitt romney chimed in urging a veto. even the nfl weighs in. with next year's super bowl set to be played in arizona, the league says it supports tolerance and inclusiveness. >> it is discrimination couched behind the belief that i can hide behind my religious beliefs. >> the opposition has been loud, but you from the backers of this bill so far we are hearing silence. we tried to find busin
emphasize tolerance and inclusiveness and prohibit discrimination based on age, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation. governor brewer has until saturday to veto the bill. hough, just a few hours ago she tweeted "i assure you, as always, i will do the right thing for the state of arizona." i throw it to you, joe. >> first of all, this was such a needle lesless battle that repus of arizona put on the front pages of papers nationwide. i say needless ba lesless becaut hard to believe that the supreme court would ever allow a law to be upheld that would let somebody that own as restaurant deny service to somebody because of their sexual orientation. for those who say, well, somebody should be able to do that based on their devout religious beliefs, do you then give -- because if you're going to allow somebody to not serve a customer based on their sexual orientation because they see that as a sin, that then allows other restaurant owners in arizona to decide they're not going to serve someone who himself been divorced, like myself, or someone who has committed adultery, or if you want
to get rid ofr race, religion, tribalism and melt them all down through a powerful centralized your accuracy and make them into a new soviet man. it collapsed because when against human nature. the imperative of the human nature. when it collapsed under the weight of human nature, there was no explosion of tribe and religion that is always under the surface. you will never rid the world of tribalism and ethnic identity. the same thing is happening now in america. we slowly lose our liberty as we have to have a powerful keepalized bureaucracy to the growing ethnic tensions in line. that is what is happening here. host: do you think there's anything that should be done right now in the ukraine? caller: no. let them do what they are going to do anyway. one thing i'd do is i admire putin because he is a nationalist. the russian people are dying out. he stopped international adoption and months to rescue his children with them. he is encouraging that through different things. i admire the guy. i wish i would have a leader like that. from john calling in pennsylvania this morning. the sen
a symbol of racial injustice. it said, abu-jamal's conviction and death sentence are religionics of a time and -- and relicarereligionics of a time ae -- of relics of a time and place of discrimination. an l.d.f. lawyer attende attendd rallies for abu-jamal. she said it was absolutely an honor to do so. she said, floss qui in the mind of -- there is no question in the mind of anyone at l.d.f. that the justice system has totally failed abu-jamal. this demagoguery of the murder of a defenseless police officer has shocked and offended law enforcement officers from across the country. the current district attorney of philadelphia, seth williams says, "apart from being patently false, moreover, these chambers are personally insulting to me. as an african-american, i know all too well the grievous consequences of racial discrimination and prejudice. i also know that abu-jamal was convicted and sentenced because of the evidence -- because of the evidence, not because of his race. i've continued to fight for the jury's verdict because it was the justice result." district attorney williams notes th
is going to cause discrimination based upon religion in arizona. i scoffed at that until tonight. when a muslim waiter serving up here walked up to sheriff joe, wouldn't give him his dinner because he says i don't serve slime. >> reporter: he was a supporter of the immigration law in 2010. he declined to speak with cnn said the statements i maid were satirical comedy. did this roast go too far? >> it was a roast. john kavanaugh is my friend. he's not a racist. there's a double standard around here. everybody is talking about him. what about the activists and these civil rights that call mena decide and hitler. why isn't there an uproar about calling me every name in the book. why are they worried about some roast? >> yes. all right. coming up next on "new day" -- it does matter when you tell jokes. coming up next on "new day" sure it's an honor being nominated but there are no losers on oscar night. wait until you see what the stars will be going home with in those gift bags. i got to go back to hollywood. >> i'm sure they will report them on their taxes. ♪ honestly? i wanted a smart
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)